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Kathy Anderson

 
Littleton, Colorado

Artist's Statement

Kathy Anderson is fascinated by people and it shows in her gentle, figurative bronzes. She strives to capture those narrative moments in the lives of children,  families and women that are simple but cherished.  Kathy’s special gift is an ability to look into and capture the spirits of her subjects and transform them into bronze.

Kathy, a Colorado artist, has earned degrees in art education from the University of Denver and University of Oregon and has studied with many prominent sculptors.

Kathy’s sculptures are held in private collections throughout the United States.   Her work has been featured in group shows at museums in several states and has been displayed in numerous juried and invitational shows where she has won awards for both her sculpture and photography.

About her Native American series below:
It is a never-ending ‘circle of life’ for Native American women from childhood through puberty, womanhood and old age.  The circle represents creation, respect, tradition and harmony.


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"Walks in Beauty"

Bronze—Edition of 20

 “Walks in Beauty” (an Arapahoe matriarch) represents ‘harmony’ – Toward the end of a woman’s life she is a useful and respected member of her tribe.  She is respected for her knowledge, wisdom and power.  As she continues to teach generations’ worth of traditions to her children and grandchildren, she has grown to ‘walk in beauty,’ in harmony, with the world around her.  She wears a robe of Arapahoe design.  Certain designs used in decoration belonged to particular families and were handed down from mother to daughter.  The elements of life were represented by certain symbols:  the triangle for tipi or mountain, or a cross for a star in the heavens.  Colors also have special meaning and the combination of symbols and colors tell the story of the robe. 

Dimensions: 20 1/2 H"x 6 1/2 W"
$1,825 plus shipping
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"Morning Star"

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"Morning Star"

Bronze - Edition of 20

“Morning Star,” (a young Sioux woman and her child) represents ‘creation’– A child is born, and life begins within the circle of the family. An infant spends most of its first year secured in an elaborately decorated cradle-board, a symbol of protection.  The buckskin exterior of the Sioux cradle was often decorated with beaded designs.  In the Sioux nation, grandparents or new parents would place the child’s remaining navel cord inside a small beaded hide bag shaped like a turtle or lizard and attach it to the cradleboard.  The amulet imitates the turtle’s hard shell; it will guard the spirit of the child and ensure a long, protected life.  The beautifully beaded buckskin dress of the young mother symbolizes a woman’s world and expresses her respect for nature, religion and everyday life. On the dress top, the two crosses are a spiritual symbol representing the morning star.

Dimensions: 20 1/2 H"x 9 1/2 W"
$1,450 plus shipping
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"Elk Heart Dreamer"

Bronze - Edition of 20

“Elk Heart Dreamer” (a Southern Cheyenne woman) represents ‘tradition’ – As a woman matured, married and became a mother, she welcomed her new responsibilities. She oversaw her household as she honored the spiritual values, traditions and beliefs of her tribe.

Plains Indian clothing displayed the woman’s artistic skill. She would decorate with paints, beads, quillwork, feathers and ribbon.  Elk’s teeth decorations indicated rank, wealth and power. A young woman’s dress may have only the upper portion of the dress covered; whereas an older matriarch’s dress may have teeth covering the entire dress down to the hem.

Dimensions: 19 H"x 5 W"
$1,550 plus shipping
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"Prairie Song"

Bronze - Edition of 20

“Prairie Song” (a young Cheyenne woman) represents ‘respect’ – No event in the life of a girl held more significance than the arrival of her first menstrual period.  Reaching womanhood was marked with an important ritual sponsored by her family.  It was a proud moment, a time of celebration. 

For this sculpture she is wrapped in a Cheyenne painted buffalo robe.  After the buffalo hunt, the women butchered and distributed the meat to the tribe; they then painted the hides.  If the robe was for a man, they used representational motifs.  For themselves they used abstract and geometric, designs.  The box-and-border design for this robe symbolizes the internal organs of the buffalo.

Dimensions: 21 H"x 6 1/2 W"
$1,650 plus shipping
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Last updated 3/10/2009 MC
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